Cable w/TAC!T Filter, XLR-3F/3M, L45cm x 4.8mm

Product Code: 017022

Tac!t is compatible with any P48 (phantom) powered microphone using a 3-pin XLR connector. It must be connected in the signal path between mic and mixer/recorder, and is ideal in situations where the user’s device has no built-in HPF.

Note that Tac!t is not compatible with un-powered dynamic or ribbon microphones, or T12 and P12 powered ones.


Main Benefits:

Sharing Options

The Rycote Tac!T (pronounced "Tas-It") filter is an in-line, active "third-order" (18dB/octave) filter with a "knee" at approximately 60Hz. This enables it to pass, unaffected, virtually all of the desired audio, while massively reducing wind and handling noise, and floor transmitted vibrations. The energy in these extreme low frequency and infrasonic sounds can be very high, and if not attenuated, would otherwise cause overloads and disturbances across the entire audio spectrum.

The Tac!T filter draws its power from the P48 phantom supply while also passing power on to the microphone. It is electronically symmetrical and does not disturb the intrinsic balance of the microphone circuit, nor does it introduce any signal loss for normal programme frequencies.

A key feature of the Tac!T filter is that it fits entirely within the body of a Neutrik XX-series XLR connector. It is not switchable, and the electronically buffered circuitry ensures that its performance is consistent for almost all phantom-powered microphones and preamplifiers in general use.

Tac!T is a fully symmetrical balanced 3rd order filter. It is has a DC path through it so that it can couple phantom power as well as signal.

What is the current draw from the recorder's or mixer's P48 supply?

Current draw is ~necessary~ for the circuit to operate - the device will not work with dynamic microphones that do not pull current. The actual current draw varies with the load used so it is not possible to give a specification figure for it. The circuit demands are very low and with IEC 26815 compliant P48 supplies it is very unlikely to cause any problems. With excessively hungry microphones (eg those that suggest they need the full 10mA available, such as Earthworks), and phantom powering that cannot deliver adequate current, or is significantly under-voltage there ~might~ be problems. The likely outcome is under-performance of the microphone in terms of max SPL etc, or increase in self-noise rather than failure.

Front-end filters on mixers are usually 6 or 12dB/octave, and these give a greater loss of wanted higher frequencies for a given cut of infrasonic or extreme LF noise. The steeper 3rd order filter (18dB/oct) is more effective. This is why the Schoeps Cut 1 and similar filters are liked by many recordists. In some cases internal filters are also fitted after a transformer and/or first amp stage - in that case these parts of the circuit can be overloaded before the internal HPF can act. Transformer inputs are particularly susceptible to infrasonic overload.

Tac!T can be used in conjunction with internal mixer filters to give a dual slope HPF, but is perhaps of greatest value in applications such as camera inputs where no LF tailoring is provided at all.
Tac!T FILTER TYPICAL PERFORMANCE
Signal loss
0dB @ 1kHz,
-3dB @ 63Hz,
-40dB @ 14Hz
Introduced noise (22Hz -22kHz) - 1.5dB
Max signal level +3dBu (<0.2% distortion)
SPECIFICATIONS
Cable Length: 45cm (18")
Cable diameter: OD 4.8 mm
Connectors: Neutrik® XX series, XLRm3* to female XLRf3, Black casing, gold pins
Cable Type: Ultra flexible Mogami® W2893 star-quad cable





1 x Cable w/TAC!T Filter, XLR-3F/3M, L45cm x 4.8mm
Product Code: 017022
In-line, active "third-order" (18dB/octave) filter with a "knee" at approximately 60Hz





Rycote Tac!T Inline Filter

Rycote Tac!T Inline Filter from Rycote on Vimeo.


Audio for Video.pdf
Audio for Video Solutions

Audio for Video_08_14.pdf
Audio for Video (update 08_14)

FAQ Categories

Spares, Repairs and Care
Problem Noises

Spares, Repairs and Care

Q. Cable with Tac!T filter: According to the specifications the Tac!T is an active "third-order" (18dB/octave) filter with a “knee" at app 60Hz" by this you mean the-3dB point at 60Hz LPF? In my experience in the field 60Hz is too low for wind noise. Wind noise can go as high as 200Hz and beyond. With a good Rycote wind jammer virtually all wind noise is eliminated unless you're doing a shoot on mount everest. And you can always use the LPF on your boom mic and your mixer if you're struggling.

A.  The 3dB point is indeed at 60Hz (or very close to that). Wind noise can certainly go up as high as 200Hz - even higher. However the spectrum is heavily biased towards the extreme LF so most of the energy is at extremely low frequencies. A good windshield and jammer will keep the noise low unless the wind is very strong, but sometimes the ideal windshield isn't available or can't be used - on top of cameras for example. The HPF on a mixer can be used in addition to the Tac!T but the crucial point about all tilted-spectrum signals is their ability to overload front-end stages and input transformers. Filters that come later in the audio chain can do nothing about this problem. That's why steep cut filters in microphones, and in-line filters such as the Schoeps Cut 1 and the Tac!T are useful tools. Front end mixer filters can only be second order (12dB/oct) at best.

Q. Cable with Tac!T filter: Regarding handling noise, the latest "plastic" suspension technology is way superior in the field than the old "elastic" based ones, so its just not something that's a problem if you actually know how to use your boom and you're listening to what you're doing.

A.  I'd love to agree:} But I know that ~no~ suspension can isolate properly below the second or third harmonic of its resonance. Thus even the best suspension (and the lyres are ~very~ good) will pass LF handling noise below about 40-50Hz - the exact frequency depends on the rig. Thus some really low handling noise will get through. It depends on the mic and the preamp bandwidth how much, but unless the LF bandwidth is severely compromised it ~will~ happen. A good HPF prevents this completely.

Q. Cable with Tac!T filter: How reliable the Tac!T cable is? Is is useless considering that there are mixers that can do the same job?

A.  It certainly isn't useless - particularly for the large array of audio kit that doesn't have ~any~ LF tailoring at all. For those that have mics or mixers with adequate bandwidth shaping then the Tac!T is unnecessary - but the purpose of designing it was because there ~is~ more and more equipment that will benefit by its use. As to going wrong... well it is a hardwired piece of high-grade surface-mount electronics and has a similar MTBF as any XLR lead.

Q. Cable with Tac!T filter: And anyway regarding wind noise - I'm probably a minority but I personally happen to like a bit of wind noise. if your shooting a documentary outside in a windy environment with the trees and everyone's hair blowing everywhere and there's absolutely no wind noise (and consequently no bass either) then the viewer or listener is not going to be drawn in in the same way. Its a personal thing I know, but we hear and feel the wind in our ears in real life so, its actually nice to be able to leave some wind noise in sometimes and convey the same sensations to someone sat in their living room.

A.  I would entirely agree. Hence the use of a 60Hz knee. It ~doesn't~ get rid of all the windnoise in those scenarios or dump all the bass. What the Tac!T does do is remove almost all the risk of muting overloads caused by infrasonic signals while still allowing you to hear plenty of natural LF sound. In the "bad old days" mics and preamps rarely had much sensitivity to very low frequency sound but with the newer transformerless output mics the extreme LF, say 10Hz, can be of the order of several volts in windy conditions or during shaking. Very few amplifier inputs can cope with signals of this level without limiting. A saturated amp stage passes no signal at ~any~ frequency. Hence Schoep's LC60 and 120 for the CCM range ... and the Tac!T.

Q. But why do I need a high pass filter? I want all that lovely bass!

A.  You want the bass but you do not want the infrasonic signals that cause severe limiting in the preamplifier. Many microphones have their own permanent in-built HPF, some have a switchable one and some rely on you fitting one elsewhere. For microphones on poles, you have to start to roll-off the sound below about 60Hz.


Problem Noises

Q. Cable with Tac!T filter: According to the specifications the Tac!T is an active "third-order" (18dB/octave) filter with a “knee" at app 60Hz" by this you mean the-3dB point at 60Hz LPF? In my experience in the field 60Hz is too low for wind noise. Wind noise can go as high as 200Hz and beyond. With a good Rycote wind jammer virtually all wind noise is eliminated unless you're doing a shoot on mount everest. And you can always use the LPF on your boom mic and your mixer if you're struggling.

A.  The 3dB point is indeed at 60Hz (or very close to that). Wind noise can certainly go up as high as 200Hz - even higher. However the spectrum is heavily biased towards the extreme LF so most of the energy is at extremely low frequencies. A good windshield and jammer will keep the noise low unless the wind is very strong, but sometimes the ideal windshield isn't available or can't be used - on top of cameras for example. The HPF on a mixer can be used in addition to the Tac!T but the crucial point about all tilted-spectrum signals is their ability to overload front-end stages and input transformers. Filters that come later in the audio chain can do nothing about this problem. That's why steep cut filters in microphones, and in-line filters such as the Schoeps Cut 1 and the Tac!T are useful tools. Front end mixer filters can only be second order (12dB/oct) at best.

Q. Cable with Tac!T filter: Regarding handling noise, the latest "plastic" suspension technology is way superior in the field than the old "elastic" based ones, so its just not something that's a problem if you actually know how to use your boom and you're listening to what you're doing.

A.  I'd love to agree:} But I know that ~no~ suspension can isolate properly below the second or third harmonic of its resonance. Thus even the best suspension (and the lyres are ~very~ good) will pass LF handling noise below about 40-50Hz - the exact frequency depends on the rig. Thus some really low handling noise will get through. It depends on the mic and the preamp bandwidth how much, but unless the LF bandwidth is severely compromised it ~will~ happen. A good HPF prevents this completely.

Q. Cable with Tac!T filter: How reliable the Tac!T cable is? Is is useless considering that there are mixers that can do the same job?

A.  It certainly isn't useless - particularly for the large array of audio kit that doesn't have ~any~ LF tailoring at all. For those that have mics or mixers with adequate bandwidth shaping then the Tac!T is unnecessary - but the purpose of designing it was because there ~is~ more and more equipment that will benefit by its use. As to going wrong... well it is a hardwired piece of high-grade surface-mount electronics and has a similar MTBF as any XLR lead.

Q. Cable with Tac!T filter: And anyway regarding wind noise - I'm probably a minority but I personally happen to like a bit of wind noise. if your shooting a documentary outside in a windy environment with the trees and everyone's hair blowing everywhere and there's absolutely no wind noise (and consequently no bass either) then the viewer or listener is not going to be drawn in in the same way. Its a personal thing I know, but we hear and feel the wind in our ears in real life so, its actually nice to be able to leave some wind noise in sometimes and convey the same sensations to someone sat in their living room.

A.  I would entirely agree. Hence the use of a 60Hz knee. It ~doesn't~ get rid of all the windnoise in those scenarios or dump all the bass. What the Tac!T does do is remove almost all the risk of muting overloads caused by infrasonic signals while still allowing you to hear plenty of natural LF sound. In the "bad old days" mics and preamps rarely had much sensitivity to very low frequency sound but with the newer transformerless output mics the extreme LF, say 10Hz, can be of the order of several volts in windy conditions or during shaking. Very few amplifier inputs can cope with signals of this level without limiting. A saturated amp stage passes no signal at ~any~ frequency. Hence Schoep's LC60 and 120 for the CCM range ... and the Tac!T.

Q. But why do I need a high pass filter? I want all that lovely bass!

A.  You want the bass but you do not want the infrasonic signals that cause severe limiting in the preamplifier. Many microphones have their own permanent in-built HPF, some have a switchable one and some rely on you fitting one elsewhere. For microphones on poles, you have to start to roll-off the sound below about 60Hz.



Product Code(s)

Cable w/TAC!T Filter, XLR-3F/3M, L45cm x 4.8mm

In-line, active "third-order" (18dB/octave) filter with a "knee" at approximately 60Hz

Product Code: 017022